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    Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

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    anissophea
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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

    Post by anissophea on Wed Dec 30, 2015 9:44 am

    Belong is a verb which is used to indicate possession or belonging to someone or something.

    For example, you have a pen. You say: That pen belongs to me.

    Just to be clear, it's wrong to say: That pen is belong to me.


    anissophea
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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

    Post by anissophea on Tue Jan 26, 2016 10:14 am

    Saya mendengar banyak sebab untuk belajar bahasa Inggeris


    untuk kerja...


    untuk sambung belajar luar negara...


    untuk peperiksaan....



    untuk melancong....



    TIDAK PERNAH SAYA DENGAR


    "Saya belajar bahasa inggeris untuk berdakwah / menerangkan Islam kepada Dunia !"



    fikir fikirkan lah...



    anissophea
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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

    Post by anissophea on Tue Feb 09, 2016 9:05 am

    Auxiliary Verbs are the verbs be, do, have, will when they are followed by another verb (the full verb) in order to form a question, a negative sentence, a compound tense or the passive.
    The verb "be"

    The verb be can be used as an auxiliary and a full verb. As an auxiliary we use this verb for compound tenses and the passive voice. Note that be is an irregular verb:

    Simple Present:
    I am, he/she/it is, we/you/they are
    Simple Past:
    I/he/she/it was, we/you/they were
    Past Participle:
    been

    You can tell that in the following sentences be is an auxiliary because it is followed by another verb (the full verb). (For progressive forms use the "-ing" form of the full verb; for passive voice, use the past participle of the full verb.)

    Progressive Forms

    Present Progressive:
    He is playing football.
    Past Progressive:
    He was playing football.
    Present Perfect Progressive:
    He has been playing football.
    Past Perfect Progressive:
    He had been playing football.

    Passive

    Simple Present/Past:
    The house is/was built.
    Present/Past Perfect:
    The house has/had been built.
    Future I:
    The house will be built.

    "be" as a full verb

    The verb be can also be a full verb. In this case, it's not followed by another verb. If be is used as a full verb, we do not need an auxiliary in negative sentences or questions.

    positive sentence:
    They are fifteen years old.
    negative sentence:
    They are not fifteen years old.
    question:
    Are they fifteen years old?

    The verb "have"

    The verb have, too, can be used both as an auxiliary and as a full verb. As an auxiliary we use this verb to form compound tenses in active and passive voice. (Use the past participle of the full verb.)

    Compound Tenses - Active Voice

    Present Perfect Simple:
    He has played football.
    Past Perfect Simple:
    He had played football.
    Present Perfect Progressive:
    He has been playing football.
    Past Perfect Progressive:
    He had been playing football.

    Compound Tenses - Passive Voice

    Present/Past Perfect:
    The house has/had been built.

    Note that have is an irregular verb, too:

    Simple Present:
    I/we/you/they have, he/she/it has
    Simple Past:
    I/he/she/it/we/you/they had
    Past Participle:
    had

    "have" in positive sentences

    As a full verb have indicates possession. In British English, however, we usually use have got (have being the auxiliary, got the full verb).

    full verb:
    I have a car.
    auxiliary verb:
    I have got a car.

    "have" in negative sentences and questions

    When we use have as a full verb, we must use the auxiliary do in negative sentences and questions. If we use have got, however, we do not need another auxiliary.

    have as a full verb:
    I do not have a car.
    Do I have a car?
    have as an auxiliary verb:
    I have not got a car.
    Have I got a car?

    The verb "will"

    The verb will can only be used as an auxiliary. We use it to form the future tenses.

    The auxiliary verb "will"

    Future I:
    He will not play football.
    Future II:
    He will have played football.

    The verb will remains the same for all forms (no "s" for 3rd person singular). The short form for negative sentences is won't.'

    Examples:
    I will, he will
    I will not = I won't

    The verb "do"

    The verb do can be both an auxiliary and a full verb. As an auxiliary we use do in negative sentences and questions for most verbs (except not for be, will, have got and modal verbs) in Simple Present and Simple Past. (Use the infinitive of the full verb.)

    The auxiliary "do" in negative sentences

    Simple Present:
    He does not play football.
    Simple Past:
    He did not play football.

    The auxiliary "do" in questions

    Simple Present:
    Does he play football?
    Simple Past:
    Did he play football?

    The verb do is irregular:

    Simple Present:
    I/we/you/they do, he/she/it does
    Simple Past:
    I/he/she/it/we/you/they did

    The full verb "do"

    As a full verb we use do in certain expressions. If we want to form negative sentences or questions using do as a full verb, we need another do as an auxiliary.

    positive sentence:
    She does her homework every day.
    negative sentence:
    She doesn't do her homework every day.
    question:
    Does she do her homework every day?

    Sentences without the auxiliary "do"

    In the following cases, the auxiliary do is not used in negative sentences/questions:

    the full verb is "be"

    Example:
    I am not angry. / Are you okay?

    the sentence already contains another auxiliary (e.g. have, be, will)

    Example:
    They are not sleeping. / Have you heard that?

    the sentence contains a modal verb (can, may, must, need, ought to, shall, should)

    Example:
    We need not wait. / Can you repeat that, please?

    the question asks for the subject of the sentence

    Example:
    Who sings that song?

    anissophea
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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

    Post by anissophea on Tue Mar 08, 2016 10:31 am

    Another word muddle I'd come across in the course of my editing work that got me scrambling for the dictionary, or dictionaries, was the confusion over "nerve-wracking" and "nerve-wrecking". And then there's "nerve-racking" to contend with. Is this all leaving you in a nervous wreck (not exactly helping there, am I)?

    Various forms of spelling have been used by journalists and writers in headlines such as these:

    A word muddle that even journos may not get right.

    Herein lies the difficulty of rationalizing the correct word to use—rack, wrack and wreck have basically identical definitions!

    wrack: severe damage or destruction.
    wreck: an action or event, such as a collision, that results in great or total destruction.
    rack: destruction; ruin.

    It does appear to make perfect sense to use any of the three words after "nerve-" going by these definitions, as they would suggest that one's nerves are in a state of destruction, describing the person's extreme anxiety.

    However, let's return to the actual meaning of what "nerve-wrecking/wracking/racking" is supposed to convey:

    inflicting great strain or irritation on one's patience, courage, or the like.

    That slowly sheds a bit more light. Do any of the three words have other definitions that would fit the "inflicting of great strain"? Bingo!

    rack: something that causes great mental or physical agony, or the agony it causes; extreme stress.

    The correct word to use is nerve-racking.

    By keeping in mind the proper meaning of this word (inflicting great strain on the nerves, and not destroying them), we can safely eliminate "wrecking", which does not carry this meaning in any of its definitions.

    But that is not the end. How about "wracking"? This is where things get interesting, and even murky.

    The Oxford Dictionary comments:

    The relationship between the forms rack and wrack is complicated. The most common noun meaning of rack, "a framework for holding and storing things", is always spelled rack, never wrack. The figurative meanings of the verb, deriving from the type of torture in which someone is stretched on a rack, can, however, be spelled either rack or wrack.

    It goes on to say:

    When used as a noun, rack is always spelled with an r (a magazine rack). The verb can be spelled rack or wrack, but only when it means "cause great pain to someone".

    Not every dictionary agrees on this though. The Chambers Dictionary, for instance, states that "wrack", when used as a verb to mean "causing pain or suffering to someone or something", is "usually regarded as an error". Yet, the same dictionary accepts "wrack" as a proper variant of "rack" when used as a noun to describe the state of destruction.

    OK, is there really any point in splitting hairs in this manner? The bottomline is this: using "nerve-racking" is 100 per cent correct. "Nerve-wracking" is generally recognised as a variant, but may not be universally accepted. If you ask me, why settle for anything less than 100 per cent correct and accepted?

    anissophea
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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

    Post by anissophea on Tue Mar 22, 2016 3:18 pm

    Unemployed because they can't speak English
    THE announcement by the government to introduce the new dual-language programme (DLP), as the added educational component to the government’s high-immersion programme (HIP) initiative helmed by the government’s Performance Management Delivery Unit (Pemandu) last year, received an overwhelming response from parents of schoolgoing children and would-be schoolgoing children, educationists, businesses and groups that have a stake in the development of education. It gives many of us hope that changes to the government’s education policy have ended. Under DLP, schools can teach Science, Mathematics, Information Technology and Communication, as well as Design and Technology, in English or Bahasa Malaysia. In its initial stage of implementation, only 300 schools are involved. This number will increase over time. Nonetheless, parents and their children can decline the offer to go to DLP schools. The idea is to check the falling standard of English in schools and raise the standard of education in national schools. It is hoped that our young citizens, after completing their primary education, those who complete secondary schools after 11 years of studies, and in particular, university graduates, will achieve an acceptable standard of mastery of the English language and be ready to start work. The problem that we have now, where more than 400,000 graduates are unemployed, most of them Malays and mostly because they can’t speak English, according to a study by Pemandu, will be addressed. No graduate will remain unemployed anymore because of their poor command of English. Nonetheless, things are not going smoothly as many thought and hoped for. Due to pressure by political groups and non-governmental organisations, such as, Persatuan Penulis Nasional Malaysia (Pena), and language nationalists, there are objections to the introduction of DLP in national schools. The say DLP will relegate the importance of the national language and introduce yellow culture. Some even feel that DLP threatens the country’s national identity. Parti Amanah Negara (Amanah), a recently formed opposition political party comprising mostly members of a Pas breakaway group, voiced its objection and is planning to organise a demonstration to oppose DLP. They believe that with the introduction of DLP, the country will make the young embrace the colonised mentality that we saw during the British occupation. This is an argument, which, to many, is absurd. For a party with a large number of Malay professionals, I wonder what is happening to Amanah’s progressive stance. Their stand is disappointing to most of us who had hopes for Amanah to raise the educational level. We have given up on them. Given their stand, and if it is allowed to happen, we will see no progress. PKR and Pas are standing their ground, as expressed by their leaders to maintain the education policy and system that has Bahasa Malaysia, the national language, as the lingua franca in national schools. This is viewed as stagnation, at best, in our standard of education and, therefore, we will also see no progress. I am not surprised to see hypocrisy being practised by high-profile opposition members, who send their children to international schools, despite their stand against the use of English in national schools. Since DLP is optional, no one should have any worry or feel threatened by its implementation, and parents can keep their children in non-DLP national schools, if they object to it. Many of us now are not too sure if opposition parties are objecting to DLP just for the sake of objecting to any new government initiative, or it is just another one of their political ploys. DLP is about being pro gressive and being globally competitive. However, if the majority of people prefer to follow the advice and stand of opposition parties and they do not want the people in this country to be globally competitive, then, there’s no need to change anything. However, they should be prepared for a downfall due to our young’s education level, no progress in education, and be prepared to see more graduates unemployed. It is hoped that the government will maintain its stand on the implementation of DLP, have the commitment to ensure its success, and go for further progress and development for the good of the people.

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    Re: Kelas B.Inggeris (Dewasa) Shah Alam,Seremban,Putrajaya,ONLINE | Translation BM- BI

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      Current date/time is Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:54 am